Woodlands Historic Park
Key to Vertebrate Animal Species List

Just take me to the Species List

Instructions

Columns in the table:

Source of Data

Instructions

Click on the column headers to sort the table on that column. One click will sort in ascending order, a second click in descending order, as indicated by the blue triangles. By default the table is sorted by Class, then within each Class by Order, then within each Order by by scientific name. To re-establish this order click on the Scientific Name column then the Order column then the Class column the Family column.

A Horizontal scroll bar will appear if the browser window is too narrow to show all columns, however the scroll bar will be at the bottom of the table so you will not see it unless you scroll down. If is is not possible to increase the width of the window, for example by rotating your device, you can click on the buttons above the table to hide particular columns. (Click again to unhide.) Alternatively you can use the zoom out function of your browser.

If you resize your browser window you may need to reload the page, since I have not yet figured out how to get the table to automatically resize in all cases.

Columns in the table:

Class
An English name corresponding to the scientific classification of Class. Blank if only one class is present in the park.
Order
An English name corresponding to the scientific classification of Order - see Classification of Organisms.
A (Alien)
An * in this column indicates that the species has arrived in Australia since British invasion.
Conservation Status - Subcolumns Australia and Victoria.
For Australia, taken from the EPBC Act List of Threatened Fauna, downloaded September 2019. For Victoria, taken from Advisory List of Threatened Vertebrate Fauna in Victoria: Victorian Government Department of Sustainability and Environment Melbourne, March 2013.
X extinct
CE Critically Endangered
E Endangered
V Vulnerable
NT Near Threatened.
(L) listed or recommended for listing on Schedule 2 of the Victorian Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988.
+ Increased since 1840s
local
X indicates that the species is no longer believed to occur in the park as a self-sustaining population. Followed by the last year it was recorded in the area, if known.
Needs
A letter H indicates that the species is likely to use tree hollows if available. Hollows may or may not be necessary for survival. This information comes from Gibbons & Lindenmayer (2002).

Source of Data

This list is based on records extracted from the Atlas of Living Australia on 17th September 2019, for a polygon enclosing the park, the former Greenvale Sanatorium Land, and Greenvale Reserve. The full reference for the download is https://doi.org/10.26197/5d7dc8be5054a. I have added species historically found in the area, from chapter 8 of the Restoration Plan. The Southern Freetail Bat was recorded in Greenvale Reserve by the Hume City Council 2015-2016 Fauna Survey.